Rasin in the Sun

Raisins, natures candy, are from by drying grapes. The play depicts the feelings and thoughts of the people 50s and 60s. Their feelings are different from what we see today in our lives. The Younger family had to deal with poverty and racism. Not having enough money and always being put down because of the color of their skin held them back from having a lot of self-respect and dignity. Not everything, including life, is as sweet as candy when dry. The Youngers financial problem left them exposed, like a grape in the hot sun. This tested their relationships, responsibility and the importance of their dreams.

A dream could be something you had in the night that seemed so real, or a dream could be your fantasy, where everything is going your way. The last type of dream is something that has more of a deep sense and plays an important role in your life. Its the same type of dream the Younger family had; everyone with his or her own hopes and dreams. Walter had his chance to be big and important with his liquor store; Beneatha wanted to become the opposite of an asimillist, a doctor; and Ruth and her wanted to move out of the rattrap of a life and home and become something bigger and more significant. The person I saw that had the foremost wishes was Mama. All she wanted was to see her family happy and to be happy herself for once. She wanted the family to stop suffering and never moving forwards. Mama wanted Travis to have his own room, and by this she sacrificed her own personal room, sharing one with Beneatha in the new house. She was sick and tired of this anguish the family received. Her dream was to see her family stop having distress and be in a higher class and to be basically being happy. In the beginning of the play Mama anticipated the insurance money coming. She hadnt decided right away on what to do but she had the basic idea. From the time she didnt have money to a little bit after, Mama began to really see what her family was put through. Before the money came, the family began to have their own dreams, and Mama listened. They varied, of course, but they had one primary meaning: to get out of the rut they were in and head somewhere big. Once Mama got the money, it took a little time, but she had her mind set, she went and bought a house. She felt it would be the one thing, which would benefit everyone in the household. She ignored the racial lines that would normally have prevented black people from even thinking of moving to that type of an area. She pursued her dream, her dream house. Once the welcoming committee showed up, Mama was luckily not there. She understood that difficulty would lie ahead, but she didnt care. Not much would stop her from her dream, not even losing the money, the essential life force of her dream. Walters incompetence isnt a big enough hurdle to prevent her from continuing her dream. She would sacrifice for her family, like working and not spend as much money. In the end of the story everything worked out fine. I think this was because she stuck so severely to it and tried her hardest not to let go of her dream. Letting go of her dream would be like giving up on life. Her dream was definitely a positive force for everyone; all she wanted to do was to make everyone happy. Walter was disappointed at times because Mama denied him the money he needed so badly, but he didnt see things the way Mama did. Just like mama says, we as going to move.(p. 121) Mama was the one who saw past all the little things that would hold her back from completing her dream. But thats the thing she did the most and the best, held on the dreams and made them come true.

Their sadness of unfulfilled dreams, compounded with the burden of Ruth’s pregnancy, began to take a toll on the Youngers relationship. When Walter says, “Who even cares about you?”(p 67) The two of them realize at that time that their relationship has dwindled to nothing but nagging and rude comments. Walter may be sorry for having said that to his wife because he probably loves her, but he is at the end of his rope. He feels that every dream he has had has been taken away from him, either by bad timing or by the white man in general. Ruth, on the other hand, has never had any other dream except to keep her family together and in working order, and now that is falling apart. Yet, relationships need at least two people, and Walter just isnt putting his share of effort into it. This is primarily because of their money issues, and their relationship begins to strengthen when they move into their new home. It just goes to show that unfulfilled dreams and money can split a relationship.

Walter felt he was financially responsible for the family, but his job as a limousine driver couldnt provide enough security. He was unhappy with his job and was desperately seeking for an opportunity to improve his family standing. He expressed these feelings when he told his mother about the liquor store. “I open and close car doors all day long. I drive a man around in his limousine and I say, “Yes sir; no sir, very good sir; shall I take the drive, sir? Mama, that ain’t no kind of job… that ain’t nothing at all. Mama, I don’t know if I can make you understand.”(p. 54) Walter could not provide for his family by American standards, so they lived in poverty. The poverty they experienced was noticeable in their living arrangements. They were a family of five who shared a one bedroom, dilapidated apartment on Chicago’s south side. Living on the south side of Chicago didnt represent the American dream that Walter so desperately wanted to obtain. There weren’t any big yards or white picket fences like those that white American children were growing up with. Travis grew up in the inner city and the projects. Ruth on the other hand was the one who kept Walter from completely destroying everything. She doesnt keep him from succeeding but from failing. Ruth tries to do everything she can to make her family happy. She just wants the best for them. Ruth understands that responsibility of a family doesnt fall to just one person; rather, it needs to be divided between two.

The Younger family over came problems within their relationship, responsibility and their dreams. We know that strength is the key to achieving dreams. This is seen by the family moving into their new home, despite racial conflicts. The strength that was required to hold Walter and Ruth together will create a safe environment for Travis and the new baby to grow up. With the dreams and the strength Walter has, he will achieve financial responsibility for his family, ending the unhappiness and turning it into a sweet raisin.